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Hi, My name is Vickie and to tell you a little bit about myself, I was born and raised in Kentucky and the majority of my ancestors have been in Kentucky since the 1790’s. I have always loved history, a good mystery and puzzles and that is what Family History Research is all about. As a child we would take day trips on Saturdays and head down some dirt road looking for old cemeteries. A lot of the time we weren't looking for anyone in particular, we just like to read the epitaphs. We would have a picnic lunch packed and have lunch at whatever cemetery we were at. If the weather was bad my Dad and I would go to a court house and dig through old records in musty old basements looking for our ancestors. So as you can see I have had an interest in Family History for quite some time.View my complete profile

Sunday, January 31, 2016

Some Loftis - Wills in Greenville County, South Carolina

Solomon Loftis, 1763-1849, Greenville County, South Carolina

I don’t know a lot about Solomon Loftis, but he was my fifth great-granduncle and he was probably born in Kent County, Delaware or Maryland.  I do know that he was the son of Job Loftis and Elvira Goodlett and one of his brothers or possibly one of his sisters was my fifth great-grandparent.  I have yet, to figure out for certain who my Labon Loftis’ father and mother were, but my DNA puts me in the Job Loftis and Elvira Goodlett family.

Sometime before 1785, this Loftis family left the Delaware/Maryland area and moved to South Carolina, possibly stopping in North Carolina for a short time.  Solomon married Margaret B. Dill in South Carolina we believe around 1788 or so and they had at least the following children: William, Andrew, John, Susan, Sarah, Pheny, Prudence, Charlotte ‘Lotty’ Ann, James and Solomon Jordan Loftis.

From the County Wills of South Carolina for Greenville County, 1787-1853, we find Solomon Loftis, Sr. in Volume 2, 1840-1853, Section C, page 192.   Solomon Loftis, Sr. wrote his will January 8, 1847 and he only mentions his three unmarried daughters: Phenia, Prudence and Lotty Ann Loftis, and he also mentions his wife, but not what her given name was.  He mentions other daughters that are married, but again does not name them and he doesn’t mention any of his sons at all.  Solomon only mentions one negro, a boy named Joe.  Solomon’s will was brought to court and recorded on August 3, 1849.  The following is the copy of the will and recording.




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John Loftis, 1772-1845, Greenville County, South Carolina

John Loftis born about 1772, died before 22 May 1845, son of Job Loftis and Elvira Goodlett and one of his brothers or possibly one of his sisters was my fifth great-grandparent.  I have yet, to figure out for certain who my Labon Loftis’ father and mother were, but my DNA puts me in the Job Loftis and Elvira Goodlett family.   The Will of John Loftis, mentions his wife Malissa Loftis and her 3 children Eliza Jane, Margaret Ellen & Sarah Elizabeth; negro named Anderson also called Tony. He mentions all his other children by his former marriage but does not name them.  Executor Edward Clements, my friend & neighbor; dated May 22, 1845; witnesses were John Bomar, William Wheeler & S. Goodlett; on July 14, 1848 Edward Clements refused to accept appointment as the executor.  Proven by Spartan Goodlett, John Bomar & William Wheeler and recorded August 4, 1848.  I only have an extract of this will, I haven’t had time to look for the original.  The following is the extract.


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Lemuel Loftis, 1774-1838, Greenville County, South Carolina

Lemuel Loftis, was born in 1774 and died on April 23, 1838 in Greenville County, South Carolina.  He was the son of Job Loftis and Elvira Goodlett and one of his brothers or possibly one of his sisters was my fifth great-grandparent.  I have yet, to figure out for certain who my Labon Loftis’ father and mother were, but my DNA puts me in the Job Loftis and Elvira Goodlett family.    Lemuel married Susannah Leech in about 1800, probably in South Carolina.   The Will of Lemuel Loftis mentions the following people: his wife Susannah Loftis, sons: Pleasant A. Loftis, Madison D. Loftis, and Spartan L. Loftis; daughters: Martha Green, Prudence Dill, Sarah L. West, Lotty Ann Crane and Achsah Few and the following negroes: Solomon, Alsa, boy named Gilbert, girl named Lurana.  The following is an extract of this will.


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Mary Carr Loftis, 1770-1829, Greenville County, South Carolina

Mary Carr Loftis, born about 1770 and died in 1829 in Greenville County, South Carolina.  I know she was the wife of Martin Loftis and that Martin Loftis was the son of Job Loftis and Elvira Goodlett and one of his brothers or possibly one of his sisters was my fifth great-grandparent.  I have yet, to figure out for certain who my Labon Loftis’ father and mother were, but my DNA puts me in the Job Loftis and Elvira Goodlett family.  I don’t know much else about Mary at this time.

Mary Carr Loftis died intestate before November 16, 1829 when her son-in-law James G. McClurg ask to be the administrator of her estate.  Margaret Loftis McClurg shared in three negroes, named: Esther, Eliza and a boy named Lewis with her mother Mary.  The following is a copy of the administration and the second page list the three negroes.




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2 comments:

  1. Cousin Vickie! I applaud you for this post! None of us like these facts, but the history is there for our family line and proven as fact ...during our ancestors timeframe it was prevalent. Whether from the north or south, slavery existed...even thru the end of the Civil War. The elephant of the prior generations has always been in the room! Though we wish we could...we cannot change history.

    Oddly, I was just looking again at Federal census records today of Job, his son Solomon and other children of Job and Elvira and mentally noting, those in federal census listed with slaves. Not to my liking, anyone liking...but it occurred.

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    1. Thanks Howard, it was a fact of life and one we can do nothing about now. Getting mad or placing blame on someone who wasn't even there is not right either and unfortunately some people will do that.

      I have done research for many African Americans over the years and it is very hard for them to get back past 1870. Others have started to go through all their old family wills and name the slaves that were listed and so I wanted to do the same thing and basically release them in hopes one of their descendants is looking for that Sam or Gilbert, Mary or Esther in their family tree.

      Hopefully I can help someone out their find the next branch on their tree.

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